- Seeing as I'm Chairman of the IGF, I thought I'd troll around and find what other coverage of last week's events at Game Developers Conference were hanging out on the web. And there's some pretty fun stuff actually, as follows (oh, and pic is from Vince's excellent collection, once again):

- Over at the San Jose Mercury News, the serene Dean Takahashi has a nice story on Everyday Shooter's Jon Mak, with a nice wry take on Mak's sharp attitude: "Mak won three awards tonight. He learned about computers by repairing them in his father’s shop while growing up. Now all of his work is paying off with “Everyday Shooter,” a music-based shooter game that his agent — yes, agent, Warren Currell of Sherpa Games — says is a combo of Rez-meets-Lumines-meets-Geometry Wars."

- Heather Chaplin has filed a report for NPR's All Things Considered discussing the IGF and Independent Games Summit, with the intro explaining: "The independent game developers tackle subjects you'd expect to find in serious cinema: a marriage in crisis, democracy, a rabbi questioning his faith. Commentator Heather Chaplin is at the conference, and she says that the development of an independent games movement is a sign that the industry might be growing up." I think the humanistic angle is a good one to take for NPR, though I will say that the IGF finalists are not, honestly, filled with social messages.

- I thought this was heartening: IGN did a nice write-up of the IGF winners, complete with some extra commentary on each game, such as Samorost 2: "every bit as visually stunning as its predecessor, and just as minimalist in its design and mouse-based control." The piece concludes: "A quick glance at a few of the above titles (which were selected from 275 entries overall) shows just how vital the indie gaming scene is right now."

- And Maw This! has a nice write-up of Day 1 of the IGS, including personal insights into Jeff Minter's reality distortion field: "All this really built up nicely to what Jeff felt games could do well, they could put players into “the zone”. His preference for abstract games stemmed from this goal - it doesn’t matter what things in the game represent, because you can have goals and achieve things (like getting points) without needing to be in a representive virtual reality. The blocks you shoot could be just blocks, the triangles don’t need to represent doggies or anything." Yes, no doggies!

- Finally, a couple of random other things - Xbox 360 Fanboy (a Joystiq/AOL spinoff joint) has hands-on with Band Of Bugs and with Castle Crashers from the IGF Pavilion, and Spong (of all sites!) has a write-up of some IGS content, though they got confused and thought it was IGDA-related. Also, I now realize that basically all of the UK journalists and basically none of the US journalists at GDC turned up for the Minter keynote - which is kinda cute! I forget sometimes that not all Yanks worship Minter as we Brits do.