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Last week I made mention of the grassroots movement to restart Mega Man Legend 3's next move: a booth at the New York Comic Con. And because I happened to be going to the show anyway, I decided to swing on by and see what they had.

As expected, their table was a love letter dedicated to the Legends games and their fans. Alongside various fan art from supporters, attendees also had the chance to add a drawing themselves, on a gigantic scroll that was to presented to Capcom of America later that weekend.

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I spoke with all the primary forces behind the initiative that were present, but the one I conversed with the most was a woman who calls herself Dashe Troxon. I stuck to the obvious questions, like what their objective was, and received fairly obvious answers in return:

"We want to raise awareness for the Mega Man Legends series so we can show Capcom that there's a viable audience, and that they can make a lot of money if they'd just release part 3."

The genesis of the movement happened shortly before the game's cancellation; when Capcom of Japan removed it from their front page, herself and others knew something was amiss. And once the unfortunate happened, efforts towards changing Capcom's mind kicked into high gear.

How much so? When asked how many hours have been dedicated: "Probably 40 hours [a week]? It's practically a full-time job."

Has there been any official response thus far? Believe it or not, but yes: "Capcom of America is actually very sympathetic. They're just unable to do anything." Capcom of Japan is the heart of the issue. After all, they're the ones who cancelled the game, despite the all the fan support, and have refused to listen to the outcry that ensued.

Not helping are cultural differences, even among fans: "We're trying to gather more support in Japan. The thing about the Japanese culture is that they're very passive. Whenever a cancellation happens, they go 'okay, fine.' Whereas here... of course we're more than a little mad. We put in a lot of work to make this happen."

Aside from gathering additional members to their cause, Get Me Off The Moon's other goal was to give concrete evidence of the fan's desire to get Legends 3 restarted. Regarding plans for that Sunday: "We're presenting a cute little book that tells everyone how it felt to learn that the wait was over.

"Some of us have been active in the fan community for ever ten years, hoping for a sequel. To finally get recognition felt so good. We want to show them how much it meant to us and the developers, to get this game finally made."

The fact that fans were actually asked to participate, but were then denied, seems to be the real sticking point. When I brought up the idea of the fans getting together to make their own game, since all the ideas contributed in the dev room were still legally theirs, Dashe Troxon was supportive of the idea, as are others. But everyone ultimately wants to see the real deal.

As for reasons to why it was cancelled: "I think it might have to do with the 3DS. I believe it would have been a system seller. Numerous people have either said 'I would have bought the system for the game' or 'I got one specifically for Legends 3, before it got cancelled."

As for how long this initiative will go on: "Until they cave or I die... If Capcom of Japan is going to be stubborn, we're going to be stubborn longer than them."

I swung by the booth the next day to check out the book they were going to present, to Seth Killian, who requested to meet the group. Here's a look...

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As for the passing along of the aforementioned book and fan art scroll to Killian, it can be seen here. Special thanks to Emi Spicer for the booth shots and Derrick Sanskrit for the book shots.