- Well, we've been posting a host of interesting content on CMP Game Group sister sites such as Gamasutra, WorldsInMotion.biz, GamesOnDeck, and GameCareerGuide.com this week, and I will attempt to wade through them in a random order (yes, we're covering Tokyo Game Show too, but every other website on the planet is, so let's go for the quirkier stuff):

- Continuing Gamasutra's histories of the games voted into the Digital Game Canon, following pieces on Spacewar, on Zork, and on Civilization, the site explores Doug Neubauer's Atari title Star Raiders, a somewhat obscure but vital precursor of the Wing Commander-esque digital space opera. The introduction explains: "Doug Neubauer’s Star Raiders was a game that made a vivid first impression. Released in 1979 for the Atari 400 and 800 computers, the game was a surprisingly complex space combat simulation. However, what left players entranced was its smooth, three-dimensional graphics. Star Raiders achieved a level of realism that few people had seen in a video game before."

- Over at online worlds site WorldsInMotion.biz, Leigh Alexander has been talking to Empire of Sports’ managing director, Christian Müller, and it's fun to hear how guilds might work if you're planning competitive sports teams: "The Coach, similar to a guild leader, has some special powers within the game. They indicate the gameplay, can nominate, dismiss or invite members on the team, and are required to play a social role." And for those wondering, the currently listed sports on the official game website reveal that "...tennis, basketball, skiing and a series of training/fitness games will be available at launch."

- Another notable Gamasutra story from earlier this week - 'The View From GameStop's Window: Retail Giant Talks Gaming In 2007', described thus: "Through multiple acquisitions and mergers, GameStop is now the predominant specialty U.S. game retailer - and Gamasutra talks to GameStop VPs Bob McKenzie and Tom DeNapoli about the state of retail for the PS3, Xbox 360, and Wii, stocking AO-rated games, the firm's digital download strategy, and more." High-level retail execs don't often talk so informally as this, and it's a nice change.

- Over at GamesOnDeck, Mathew Kumar has been chatting to Alex Goatcher of Mikoishi, a team which "...has developed mobile titles such as Phoenix Wright and Star Wars Battlefront Mobile, but have recently begun to concentrate on original IP and new platforms such as Nintendo DS and PC." Their new franchise sounds a bit crazed, too: "SteamIron: The Fallen... is an epic cross-platform sci-fi fantasy that plays out over multiple installments on both handheld and PC platforms.The story begins on 3G mobile with SteamIron: The Fallen with future installments planned for mobile, Nintendo DS culminating in a PC MMOG scheduled for release in 2009." Blimey.

- Finally, and this article really deserves a bit more notice than it go, we ran a detailed analysis of Codemasters and Activision's legal fight over Turning Point: Fall Of Liberty on Gamasutra. It's notable because it's overflow from an already-acrimonious Spark vs. Activision lawsuit. Highlights would include Spark's lawyers insisting the company was not working on a WWII title, and then signing an alternate reality post-WWII title (featuring Nazis!) with Codemasters, and Activision's internal emails about paying Spark royalties on the Call Of Duty title they worked on: "[Spark] will not be seeing a royalty check from me. I think this means that we’ve essentially replicated the ‘scorched earth’ scenario… royalty reductions [are] locked in, as [is Activision’s] ability to make them recoup against every expense known to man.” Ouch!