- Finishing off the weekend with a whole mess of cute and leftover links, we are, starting with a little look at a new ARG from master of the pained Trent Reznor and friends:

- ARGN has revealed a possible new ARG based around Nine Inch Nails' new album commenting: "With speculation that this might be the latest production from 42 Entertainment, curiosity about the way the story is being told (is this a flashback hidden between clips of music, a la The Handmaid's Tale? And how is it being transmitted back in time to 2007?) and a claim from Trent Reznor that this is not "some gimmick to get you to buy a record...this IS the art form," which is "just getting started," interest is high. The scheduled release of the Year Zero album is 4/17/07. Until then do not drink the water."

- YouTube alert! Firstly, via The-Inbetween, we have a couple of cool 8-bit/game-ish music videos. The first is for DJ Shadow's 'This Time (I'm Gonna Try It My Way)', and is cute NES-style animation all the way, whereas the other, for Cadence Weapons' 'Sharks', is weird indie Canadian hiphop with lots of Mario and Street Fighter references. Checking around more, I found the game segments from excellent UK spoof series 'Look Around You', all faux science-programmed up. Then again, YouTube also brings us the final round of Twister at the Kingdom Hearts pyjama party during Katsucon. YouTube, stop it. Now.

- Just released last week - a new trailer for Bit-Blot's Aquaria, one of the IGF Grand Prize finalists for this year, and one of the more beguiling indie games of late - this one shows a lot more... stuff! A couple of other IGF notes - the Audience Award is still open for voting over at GameSpot, if you haven't, and the official website just announced the GameTap Indie Award, an additional sekrit prize from this year's Platinum Sponsors - more info at the award show!

- You've probably seen it everywhere else, but this anti-PS3 video, as linked on Kotaku, is an irresistable, repellent piece of propaganda, with many extra marks for a mangling of The Fray's song 'How To Save A Life'. The Phil Harrison quote cut-ups at the end are somewhat Michael Moore worthy (or beyond), but I can't look away. Away from the light!

- Over at Venture Beat, they have a little piece on King.com's 'American Idol' web game which meanders around: "King.com, a European company with $43 million in financial backing from Apax and individuals, has just released one of the more expensively developed games so far: American Idol. It cost more than $250,000 to make (not much compared to full-fledged download games like WoW; remember, we’re talking pure Web-based games)." There's a comment from PlayFirst boss John Welch at the bottom of the piece, too, which is abstractly interesting.

- Aha, the kinda fun GamerZines has released 'HandHeld GamerZine Issue 1', and it "...includes reviews of Sid Meier's Pirates! (PSP), Mario vs Donkey Kong 2 (DS), Ghost Rider (PSP), Dungeon Siege Throne of Agony (PSP), Castlevania Portrait of Ruin (DS), Bomberman Land Touch (DS) and more. There are previews of Driver 76 (PSP), Zelda Phantom Hourglass (DS), Call of Duty Roads to Victory (PSP), Pokemon Diamond/Pearl (DS) and an exclusive interview on Burnout Detonator (DS)." May be worth checking.

- Selectbutton has a grumpy, in-depth piece on Uru: Ages Beyond Myst, but it's not quite what you think: "I had bought the game because it was a new release from the Myst series; one of the only things I hold fandom over. The game had been left to collect dust on my shelf for years. The draw of Myst online had excited the hell out of me, but not enough to play the game immediately. So it sat there untouched, and about a month after I bought it I read that probably due to lack of interest the online portion would never see the light of day. So the will to played the game died down even more. Just recently Gametap has put up the game with online play. Unfortunately I'm leaving the country soon so I can't check that out. So I'll have a review of single player portion of a game that was re-released." It's still interesting, though.

- My co-worker Brandon uses his 'power' as an editor of Game Developer to ask Sony how many bits the PS3 has, and then post about it on Insert Credit. I think he did it mainly to see my reaction when I found out about his query, but the answer is pretty fun, actually: "The PS3 is 128 bit, but it is more 128 bit than the others. The number of bits isn't really a very good measure anymore. To be honest, it hasn't been a good measure since PS1 days. That said... Most single pieces of data fit in 32 or 64 bits. The benefit of 128 bits is that you can operate on 4 pieces of 32-bit data at the same time, which is called SIMD (Single Instruction, Multiple Data). This is only useful for data that needs the same operation on all 4 pieces, which is common in games for things such as 3D graphical transformations, physical simulation, collision detection, etc. 128-bits is the "sweet spot" of price and performance, so that is what everyone seems to have settled upon."

- Briefly following up a recent post about the GBA Bit Generations series being cheap at Play-Asia - looks like Soundvoyager, Dotstream, Digidrive, Dialhex, and Boundish are back in stock at the $14.90 price point, for anyone who missed out - and I also spotted that several obscure Dot-S mosaic sets, including Xevious (scroll down for Mappy and Tower Of Druaga!) are just $4.90, a bit of a deal. (We have no commercial relationship with P-A, incidentally.)